HSA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

D. Contributions

1. What is the maximum contribution I can make to my Health Savings Account?

IRS Maximum Contribution IU Annual Contribution Your Maximum Annual Contribution Your Maximum Annual Contribution if Age 55 or Older
Anthem PPO HDHP
Employee-only $3,650 $1,300 $2,350 $3,350
All other coverage levels $7,300 $2,600 $4,700 $5,700
IU Health HDHP
Employee-only $3,650 $1,600 $2,050 $3,050
All other coverage levels $7,300 $3,200 $4,100 $5,100

The amount you can contribute to an HSA is set by federal regulations and is adjusted annually for inflation. The IRS maximums are the combined total of IU contributions, employee's contributions to their HSA, spouse’s contributions to their own HSA (if applicable), and contributions made to an Archer MSA (if applicable). These maximums can be further affected by the number of months you are covered under an HDHP. 

Examples:

  • If your HDHP was effective January 1st, and you maintain HDHP coverage for the entire plan year, the total amount you can contribute to your account is the full maximum contribution amount set by the IRS.
  • If this is your first year of coverage under a HDHP and you start mid-year, you can contribute up to the full maximum contribution limit; including a full catch-up amount if age 55 or greater, so long as you start your HDHP coverage no later than December 1 of that year. In this case; however, you will be subject to a testing period. The testing period requires that you maintain HSA eligibility for a period beginning on December 1 of the year you started and ending on December 31 of the next year. If you lose HSA-eligibility during the testing period (for reasons other than death or becoming disabled) you will have to include the excess contributions as taxable income. You will also have to pay a penalty on that contribution amount.
  • If your HDHP coverage ends mid-year, and is not continued through COBRA or through another employer’s HDHP, your maximum contribution amount is pro-rated based on the number of months your HDHP was in effect.

Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969. If your contributions have exceeded the IRS prorated maximum, you must work with Nyhart to resolve the excess contribution issue. Excess contributions not withdrawn from the Health Savings Account are subject to a 6% excise tax until withdrawn. Reporting requirements for excess contributions are detailed in the Instructions for IRS Form 8889.

Contact Nyhart for instructions on how to remove “excess contributions” from your HSA at 800-284-8412 or at .

2. Do the IRS contribution maximums include the university's contribution?

Yes, The IRS maximums are the combined total of IU contributions and the employee's contributions to their HSA.

Example: Employee elects 'Employee Only Coverage.' The IRS maximum for 2022 for employee only coverage is $3,650. IU contributes $1,300 to the HSA for enrollment in the Anthem PPO HDHP. The employee is then eligible to contribute up to $2,350 before reaching the IRS maximum. ($3,650 - $1,300 = $2,350).

3. How much does IU Contribute to my Health Savings Account?

When you are enrolled in the Anthem PPO HDHP, IU contributes $1,300 for those with employee-only coverage level or $2,600 for all other coverage levels.

When you are enrolled in the IU Health HDHP, IU contributes $1,600 for those with employee-only coverage level or $3,200 for all other coverage levels.

IU’s annual contribution is deposited into your HSA as one lump sum and is not prorated. If you elect the HSA during Open Enrollment, IU’s contribution is made with your second paycheck in January. For mid-year elections (e.g. new hires, life event changes), IU’s contribution is typically made by the second payroll cycle after your election is made; however, the timing depends on when the election is made and on payroll deadlines. Access to those funds depends on when the HSA is established with Nyhart.

Mid-year enrollments or coverage changes on or after September 1 do not receive IU’s contribution (or an adjustment to IU’s contribution) for that year.

4. When does IU make its contribution to my Health Savings Account?

If you elect the HSA during Open Enrollment, IU’s contribution is made with your second paycheck in January. For mid-year elections (e.g. new hires, life event changes), IU’s contribution is typically made by the second payroll cycle after your election is made; however, the timing depends on when the election is made and on payroll deadlines. Access to those funds depends on when the HSA is established with Nyhart.

Mid-year enrollments or coverage changes on or after September 1 do not receive IU’s contribution (or an adjustment to IU’s contribution) for that year.

5. How do I contribute to my Health Savings Account?

Your contributions are made through payroll deductions spread out equally over your pay periods (assuming a 12 month pay schedule).

6. If I go out on Leave or I am only paid 10 months out of the year, how does that affect my HSA contributions?

When you select your annual pledge amount during open enrollment each year the system will automatically assume you will receive 12 or 26 paychecks for that year.  For example: if you select $1,200 for your annual pledge then you will have $100 taken from each of your monthly paychecks or $46.15 from each of your bi-weekly paychecks.

If you start HSA contributions mid-year or you do not receive one or more regularly scheduled paychecks, then the system will look at how much of your annual pledge you have contributed year-to-date and calculate how many paychecks remain in the year and will break down the remaining annual pledge evenly over the remaining number of paychecks.  This way you will always meet your pledge amount by the end of the year regardless of how many actual paychecks you receive. See example below.

Example: Annual Pledge:  $1200
Jan $200 ($1200 / 12 paychecks)*
Feb  $100
Mar $100
April  $100
May No paycheck
June $116.67 ($700 remaining pledge / 6 remaining paychecks)
July $116.67
Aug $116.67
Sept $116.67
Oct No paycheck
Nov $233.33 ($233.33 remaining pledge / 1 remaining paychecks)
Dec $0
Total:  $1200 by year end

*For monthly paid employees, January has two monthly paychecks. December has none.

7. Can I contribute a lump sum amount to my HSA?

Yes and No.  The payroll system is not able to accommodate one-time lump sum deductions for the HSA contribution.  Any amount elected for the HSA will automatically be designated as an annual amount to be taken from paychecks over the course of the year.

However, you can make contributions to your HSA from sources outside of payroll. You can transfer money from a personal account directly to your HSA or you can send a check to Nyhart along with the appropriate deposit form. Any contributions put in your account on an after-tax basis are eligible to be deducted from your gross taxable income on your tax return.

You are responsible for tracking your contributions to ensure you don't exceed the IRS annual contribution limits.

8. How do I change the contribution amount taken from my paychecks?

You can change, suspend, or stop HSA contributions at any time during the year by submitting an HSA Enrollment / Change Form or by submitting an Optional Benefit Change online:

  1. Log in to the Employee Center using your IU username/passphrase and Duo
  2. Select the Benefit Details tile
  3. Select the Optional Benefit Changes tile
  4. Click the green button to Start Optional Benefit Change
  5. To progress through the OBC process, click the Next button in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.
  6. Verify your personal information, and payroll direct deposit and tax withholding details, and make updates if needed.
  7. Click the Start My Enrollment button. On the next screen click the gray Select button next to the event.
  8. Under the ‘Benefit Plans’ heading, select the Health Savings Account tile and make any desired changes.
  9. Review your elections by selecting the Enrollment Preview Statement button under the ‘Enrollment Summary’ heading. Click the X in the upper right-hand corner of the screen to exit the preview.
  10. When you are finished making changes, click the green Submit Enrollment button under the ‘Enrollment Summary’ heading.
  11. A confirmation message will appear on the screen once your elections have been submitted successfully. Additionally, an e-mail confirming your submission will be sent to your IU email address within one business day. If you do not receive an email, your changes were not submitted properly.

The contribution deducted from each remaining pay period will be automatically computed by the payroll system. The computation will take into account your new ANNUAL contribution request, subtract what you've already contributed, then divide by the number of remaining pay periods (assuming twelve months of pay periods). The number of remaining pay periods is determined by when the request is submitted and processed in relation to pay calculations. Pay calculations close approximately one week before pay is issued; elections received after a pay period closing are not effective until the following pay period.

You may not reduce your annual amount below what you have contributed to date as refunds are not an option. The annual contribution must be an amount between the minimum and maximum amounts.

9. Can I make contributions to my HSA outside of payroll deductions?

Yes, you can transfer money from a personal account directly to your HSA or you can send a check to Nyhart along with the appropriate deposit form.

Any contributions put in your account on an after-tax basis are eligible to be deducted from your gross taxable income on your tax return.

You are responsible for tracking your contributions to ensure you don't exceed the IRS annual contribution limits.

10. Do my spouse’s HSA contributions affect how much I can contribute?

Yes. If your spouse receives or makes contributions to an HSA through IU or another employer, you must collectively adhere to the IRS maximum contribution limits.

HSA maximums are the combined total of employer contributions, employee’s contributions to their own HSA, spouse’s contributions to their own HSA (if applicable), and contributions made to an Archer MSA (if applicable).

The maximums can further be affected by the number of months you are covered under an HDHP when less than a full year or when the employee or their spouse experience a life event that results in a change in coverage levels mid-year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969 (PDF).

It is the employee’s responsibility to track their contributions to ensure they do not exceed the IRS annual contribution limits.

11. If my spouse and I each have our own HSA, what is our combined contribution maximum?

2022 IRS Maximums:

  • If you and your spouse are each enrolled in employee-only HDHP coverage, each of you are subject to the employee-only HSA limit ($3,650 each).
  • If either you or your spouse has ‘family’ HDHP coverage (employee with children or family coverage), then you will be subject to the family contribution limit ($7,300) as a couple. In other words, if you or your spouse cover family members on your HDHP, your combined HSA contributions cannot exceed $7,300.
  • If you are age 55 or older by the end of the tax year, you can contribute up to an additional $1,000 each year to your HSA (make a "catch-up contribution"). If you and your spouse are both eligible to make a catch-up contribution (i.e. enrolled in an HDHP, either together or separately, and age 55+), you can each make a $1,000 catch-up contribution, but each of you must deposit the funds into your own individual HSA.

Remember, HSA maximums are the combined total of IU’s contributions, your contributions to your HSA, your spouse’s contributions to their own HSA (if applicable), and contributions made to an Archer MSA (if applicable).

These maximums can further be affected by the number of months you are covered under an HDHP if you enroll or make plan changes mid-year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969.

12. If my spouse and I both work for the university, should we enroll separately or together?

You can enroll together under the higher compensated spouse or enroll separately under your individual salary bands in the medical plan of your choice.

HSA maximums are the combined total of employer contributions to each HSA, Spouse #1’s contributions to their own HSA, Spouse #2’s contributions to their own HSA, and contributions made to any Archer MSA (if applicable).

Considerations for enrolling in separate medical plans:

  • Each spouse would have their own medical plan deductible and out-of-pocket maximum in their medical plans. Their health care expenses would not accumulate together.
  • Each spouse could have their own HSA and would receive separate contributions from IU at their respective coverage level. For example:
    • Spouse #1 has employee-only Anthem HDHP coverage and receives $1,300 from IU to their HSA. Spouse #2 has employee-only Anthem HDHP coverage and also receives $1,300 from IU to their own HSA, for a total of $2,600 in IU contributions. The maximum IRS contribution for both spouses combined is $7,300, so they can only contribute an additional $4,700 between both them by agreement.
    • Spouse #1 has employee-only IU Health HDHP coverage and receives $1,600 from IU to their HSA. Spouse #2 has employee & child(ren) IU Health HDHP coverage level and receives $3,200 from IU to their HSA, for a total of $4,800 in IU contributions. The maximum IRS contribution for both spouses combined is $7,300, so they can only contribute an additional $2,500 between both spouses by agreement.
    • Spouse #1 has employee & child(ren) Anthem HDHP coverage and receives $2,600 from IU to their HSA. Spouse #2 has employee & child(ren) IU Health HDHP coverage level and receives $3,200 to their HSA, for a total of $5,800 in IU contributions. The maximum IRS contribution for both spouses combined is $7,300, so they can only contribute an additional $1,500 between both spouses by agreement.
  • If one or both spouses are age 55+ they could contribute a catch-up contribution to their own HSA to increase their overall IRS contribution maximums. For example:
    • Spouse #1 is age 55+ and Spouse #2 is under age 55: their combined contribution maximum would be $8,300 ($7,300 to be split between spouses by agreement, $1,000 catch-up contribution made to Spouse #1’s HSA)
    • Both spouses are age 55+: their combined contribution maximum would be $9,300 ($7,300 to be split between spouses by agreement, $1,000 catch-up contribution to be contributed to Spouse #1’s HSA and $1,000 catch-up contribution to be contributed to Spouse #2’s HSA)

It is the employee’s responsibility to track their contributions to ensure they do not exceed the IRS annual contribution limits.

13. If both spouses are enrolled in an HDHP, and one or both spouses also have other coverage, are both spouses eligible for an HSA? How much can each spouse contribute?

The following examples describe how much can be contributed under varying circumstances. Assume that neither spouse qualifies for "catch-up contributions."

When a spouse has an HDHP with another employer or enrolls separately from their spouse, the university will not be able to assist in limiting contributions to statutory maximums. If an employee or their spouse exceeds statutory maximums, he or she is responsible for taking corrective actions and responsible for any tax consequences.

Example 1: Jan, an IU employee, is enrolled in the Anthem PPO HDHP. She covers her spouse, Mike, on her plan.

  • Jan has no other coverage.
  • Mike has additional self-only coverage through his employer which has a deductible less than $1,400. Since he has coverage that does not qualify as an HDHP, he is not eligible to contribute to an HSA in his name.
  • Jan may contribute $7,300 to an HSA in her name because she covers one or more individuals on her plan, therefore qualifies for the family maximum.

Example 2: Dave, an IU employee, is enrolled in the IU Health HDHP. He covers his spouse, Ellen, on his plan.

  • Dave has no other coverage.
  • Ellen has additional self-only HDHP coverage through her employer which has a deductible greater than $1,400.
  • Both Dave and Ellen are eligible to have and to contribute to their own HSA. However, because they are married, they are only eligible to contribute up to the combined family maximum of $7,300 between both accounts.  

Example 3: John, an IU employee, is enrolled in the Anthem PPO HDHP. He covers his spouse, Charlie, on his plan.

  • John has no other coverage.
  • Charlie has additional employee & child(ren) HDHP coverage with a deductible greater than $2,800.
  • Both John and Charlie are eligible to have and to contribute to their own HSA. However, because they are married, they are only eligible to contribute up to the combined family maximum of $7,300 between both accounts.  

Example 4: Sam, an IU employee, is enrolled in the IU Health HDHP. He covers his spouse, Anne, on his plan.

  • Sam and Anne also have family coverage with a $200 deductible through Anne’s employer plan.
  • Sam and Anne are treated as having family coverage with the lower annual deductible ($200). The $200 deductible does not meet the IRS minimum requirements of an HDHP, thus neither Sam nor Anne are eligible for and neither may contribute to an HSA.

Example 5: Mary, an IU employee, is enrolled in the IU Health HDHP. She covers her spouse, Julie, on her plan.

  • Mary has no other coverage. Mary may contribute $7,300 to an HSA in her name because she covers one or more individuals on her plan, therefore qualifies for the family maximum.
  • Julie is also enrolled in Medicare. Julie is not eligible and cannot contribute to an HSA.

Example 6: Martin and Jean are married and both work for IU. They are each enrolled in employee-only Anthem PPO HDHP coverage.

  • Martin has no other coverage. Martin can contribute $3,650 (the individual maximum) to his HSA.
  • Jean has no other coverage. Jean can also contribute $3,650 (the individual maximum) to her HSA.
  • Each is only eligible to contribute up to the individual lRS limit because they each only cover themselves.

Example 7: Samantha and Gary are married and both work for IU. Samantha is enrolled in employee & child(ren) IU Health HDHP coverage. Gary is enrolled in employee-only Anthem PPO HDHP coverage.

  • Samantha has no other coverage.
  • Gary has no other coverage.
  • Both Samantha and Gary are eligible to have and contribute to their own HSA. However, because they are married, they are only eligible to contribute up to the combined family maximum of $7,300 between both accounts.

HSA maximums are the combined total of employer contributions, employee’s contributions to their own HSA, spouse’s contributions to their own HSA (if applicable), and contributions made to an Archer MSA (if applicable).

These maximums can further be affected by the number of months you are covered under an HDHP less than a full year or when the employee or their spouse experiences a life event that results in a change in coverage levels mid-year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969.

14. What are the contribution limits for participants age 55+?

If you and your spouse are each enrolled in Employee-only HDHP coverage, each of you are subject to the Employee-only HSA limit ($3,650 each). If either you or your spouse has ‘family’ HDHP coverage (Employee with Children or Family coverage), then as a couple you will be subject to the family contribution limit ($7,300). This means that if either you or your spouse cover family members on your HDHP, your combined HSA contribution limit is the annual maximum for family coverage ($7,300).

Those turning age 55 or older during the year may contribute up to an additional $1,000 each year to the HSA (make a "catch-up contribution"). You and your spouse can each make the $1,000 catch-up contribution, but you must deposit the funds into separate accounts. This means that in order for both you and your spouse to elect the catch-up, you must enroll in separate medical plans.

Example 1: Joan, age 56, and Michael, age 60, are married. Both are enrolled in the Anthem PPO HDHP with employee-only coverage and each has their own HSA.

  • Joan and Michael are each eligible to contribute the individual IRS limit of $3,600 to their individual HSA.
  • Joan can also contribute an additional $1,000 to her HSA.
  • Michael can also contribute an additional $1,000 to his HSA.

Example 2: Jeremiah, age 60, and Michelle, age 52, are married IU employees. Jeremiah has IU Health HDHP employee and child(ren) coverage. Michelle has IU Health HDHP employee-only coverage. Each has their own HSA.

  • Because Jeremiah covers one or more individuals, they are both treated as having family coverage for purposes of determining the annual IRS maximum contribution limit.
  • Jeremiah and Michelle can contribute up to the combined family maximum of $7,300 between both accounts.
  • Because Jeremiah is over age 55, he can contribute an additional $1,000 to his HSA.

Example 3: Thomas, age 60, and Isabel, age 55, are married IU employees. Thomas covers them under Anthem PPO HDHP employee/spouse coverage. Thomas has an HSA. Isabel has no other coverage, therefore is not eligible for an HSA.

  • Thomas can contribute up to the family maximum of $7,300 to his HSA because he covers one or more family members on his plan.
  • Because Thomas is over age 55, he can also contribute an additional $1,000 to his HSA.
  • Even though Isabel is over age 55, Thomas cannot contribute an additional $1,000 to his HSA on her behalf because Isabel does not own the account.

HSA maximums are the combined total of employer contributions, employee’s contributions to their own HSA, spouse’s contributions to their own HSA (if applicable), and contributions made to an Archer MSA (if applicable).

The maximums can further be affected by the number of months you are covered under an HDHP when less than a full year or when the employee or their spouse experience a life event that results in a change in coverage levels mid-year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969.

15. What if I am only eligible part of the year?

If this is your first year of coverage under a HDHP and you start mid-year, you can contribute up to the full applicable federal limit; including a full catch-up amount if age 55 or greater, so long as you start your HDHP coverage no later than December 1 of that year. In this case; however, you will be subject to a testing period. The testing period requires that you maintain HSA eligibility for a period beginning on December 1 of the year you started and ending on December 31 of the next year.

If this is not your first year of the HSA and you stop your HSA eligibility mid-year, you are only allowed to contribute 1/12 of the applicable federal limit times the number of months you were eligible.

16. What happens if I contribute more than the IRS annual maximum?

You are responsible for tracking your contributions to ensure you don't exceed the IRS annual contribution limits.

If your contributions have exceeded the IRS maximum, you must work with Nyhart to resolve the excess contribution issue. Excess contributions not withdrawn from the Health Savings Account are subject to income taxes and an additional 6% excise tax until withdrawn. You should be aware of the reporting requirements for excess contributions as detailed in the Instructions for IRS Form 8889 (PDF).

Please contact your tax advisor if you have additional questions.

17. What happens if I don’t withdraw my excess contributions prior to April 15th of the following year?

You must pay a 6% excise tax on any excess contribution and on any earnings of the excess contribution. If in the next year you decreased your maximum contribution by the amount of your excess contribution made the year before, you do not have to pay the 6% excise tax again.  However, for as long as you leave the excess contribution in, you will need to pay an annual 6% excise tax on this amount and its earnings.

Please contact your tax advisor if you have additional questions.

Contact Nyhart for instructions on how to remove “excess contributions” from your HSA at 800-284-8412 or at .

Review IRS Publication 969 (PDF) and Instructions for IRS Form 8889 (PDF) for further details.

18. What are catch-up contributions?

If you are an eligible individual who is age 55 or older by the end of your tax year, your contribution limit is increased by $1,000. For example, if you have employee-only coverage, you can contribute up to $4,650 for 2022 (the contribution limit for employee-only coverage ($3,650) plus the additional contribution of $1,000.)

If you are an eligible individual for only part of the year, all contributions (including the catch-up contribution) would be pro-rated based on the number of months that you are an eligible individual. For example: You have the HDHP coverage at the employee-only level and you are eligible for the additional catch-up contribution of $1,000. In July you turned age 65 and enrolled in Medicare, thus making you no longer eligible to make HSA contributions on a tax-free basis. Your contribution limit would be $2,325 for 2022 ($4,650 IRS max / 12 months x 6 months of eligibility).

19. If my spouse is age 55 or older, am I eligible to make the catch-up contribution?

No. HSA accounts are individual accounts, not joint accounts. The primary accountholder must be the individual who is age 55 or older in order to make the catch-up contribution. If your spouse has their own HSA and is an eligible individual, they can contribute a separate catch-up contribution to their own HSA.

20. Do I have to continue to fund my account each year?

Each year that you elect to participate in the HSA, you must make the minimum contribution of $300. You are not required to contribute to your account above the minimum.

You are not required to continue participation in the HSA each year. You may stay enrolled in an HDHP plan and waive the HSA or you can change to any other plan offered by the university. Be aware, however, when you are not enrolled in an HDHP you cannot contribute to the Health Savings Account component of the plan, but you can continue to use existing funds for qualified health expenses.

If you STOP your HSA Contributions (not suspend), your account will become an “individual” account that is no longer associated with IU.  You will then become responsible for the monthly account maintenance fees (currently $2.75/month).

21. What happens during the year if I have a qualified life event change?

You will be able to continue contributing to the Health Savings Account; however, the maximum amount you are permitted to contribute will be the greater of the maximum annual HSA contribution based on your HDHP coverage on the first day of the last month of your tax year (December 1st) or the amount that results when you prorate appropriately for the number of months you were enrolled in each coverage level.

Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969 (PDF).

22. I am age 65 and covered under an HDHP, can I still contribute to my HSA?

Maybe. As long as you have not enrolled in Medicare Part A or B you will remain an eligible individual and may continue to make and receive pre-tax contributions to your HSA.

Turning age 65 only makes you eligible to enroll in Medicare. Enrollment in Medicare part A is not automatic for most people. You would need to take action and enroll in Medicare benefits online if you want to receive Medicare coverage. You do not, however, need to enroll in Medicare if you want to continue to take advantage of the HSA. As long as you maintain active group coverage (like on an IU medical plan) you can enroll in Medicare at a later time without penalty. However, be aware, that if you choose to delay your Medicare enrollment until after your initial eligibility period (age 65), when you do eventually enroll in Medicare, Medicare will set the effective date of your Medicare Part A coverage either back 6 months or to your 65th birthday, whichever is most recent. That may mean your eligibility to make contributions to your HSA will be prorated for the year.

If you are drawing your or your spouse’s social security benefits, your enrollment in Medicare Part A will be automatic and you will no longer be eligible to make tax-free contributions to an HSA as of the effective date of your Medicare enrollment. Complete the HSA Enrollment/Change Form (PDF) to Stop your HSA Contributions. Then determine if you have excess contributions for that year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969 (PDF). If your contributions have exceeded the IRS maximum, you must work with Nyhart to resolve the excess contribution issue.

If you STOP your HSA Contributions (not suspend), your account will become an “individual” account that is no longer associated with IU.  You will then become responsible for the monthly account maintenance fees (currently $2.75/month).

23. I am collecting my social security benefits and covered under an HDHP, can I still contribute to my HSA?

Not on a tax-free basis. If you are drawing your or your spouse’s social security benefits, your enrollment in Medicare Part A will be automatic and you will no longer be eligible to make tax-free contributions to an HSA as of the effective date of your Medicare enrollment.

If you have become ineligible to make tax-free contributions to your HSA and still choose to participate in the HSA plan, you may do so, however none of the ineligible contributions are to remain in your HSA account at the end of the year.  Instead, you must remove all contributions that are not eligible to remain tax-free in your account as “excess contributions”.  Then report that amount on your federal tax return as taxable income.

If you choose to no longer participate in the HSA, complete the HSA Enrollment/Change Form (PDF) to STOP your HSA Contributions. Then determine if you have excess contributions for that year. Details on the calculation of the IRS prorated maximum can be found in IRS publication 969 (PDF). If your contributions have exceeded the IRS maximum, you must work with Nyhart to resolve the excess contribution issue.

If you STOP your HSA Contributions (not suspend), your account will become an “individual” account that is no longer associated with IU.  You will then become responsible for the monthly account maintenance fees (currently $2.75/month).

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